Types of salts

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Re: Types of salts

Post by Aneesh Yadav on Thu Sep 10, 2015 5:40 am


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Re: Types of salts

Post by VK KUMAR on Wed Sep 09, 2015 9:26 pm

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Kosher Salt
Use it for: All cooking. Kosher salt dissolves fast, and its flavor disperses quickly, so chefs recommend tossing it on everything from pork roast to popcorn.
Crystalline Sea Salt
Use it for: Adding a pungent burst of flavor to just-cooked foods. These crystals will complement anything from a fresh salad to a salmon fillet.

Origin: Coasts from Portugal to Maine, California to the Pacific Rim.
Flaked Sea Salt
Use it for: Bringing a complex flavor to steamed vegetables or shellfish. Take a pinch, crush the crystals between your fingertips, and let them fall on freshly cooked food. This salt will add a hint of briny flavor.

Origin: England's Essex coast is where the most popular brand, Maldon, is harvested.
Fleur de Sel
Use it for: A special-occasion table salt. Spoon it into a salt cellar to be pinched, then sprinkled over food just before eating. Delicately flavored, it adds a perfect hint of saltiness to freshly sliced tomato or melon.

Origin: Coastal salt ponds in France. The caviar of sea salt, fleur de sel is hand harvested. Conditions have to be just right (lots of sun and wind) for it to "bloom" like a flower on the surface of the water.
Rock Salt
Use it for: Making ice cream and deicing. Rock salt is paired with ice in old-fashioned hand-cranked ice cream makers to regulate the temperature. You can also use it to deice your sidewalks and driveway in the winter months.

Origin: Mined from deposits in the earth, rock salt is not sold for use directly on food. It's usually packaged in an organic, unprocessed form.
Pickling Salt
Use it for: Brining pickles and sauerkraut. It will also brine a turkey, but beware: Pickling salt is far more concentrated than the more commonly used kosher salt, so you'll need to use less.

Origin: Like table salt, pickling salt may come from the earth or the sea. But unlike table salt, it isn't fortified with iodine (a nutritional need for humans) and doesn't contain anticaking chemicals, both of which would turn pickles an unappetizing color. Virtually 100 percent sodium chloride, it's the purest of salts.

Properties of Ionic Compounds (Salts):
Ionic compounds are composed of a cation (positively charged atom) and an anion (negatively charged atom) in an orderly arrangement. The three dimensional arrangement of atoms or ions in a crystal is referred to as crystal lattice. The crystal lattices of sodium chloride and cesium chloride are shown below.
The simplest repeating unit of a crystal is known as a unit cell. Both NaCl and CsCl are classified as part of a cubic crystal system. The unit cells of NaCl and CsCl are different because their ions have different sizes. Three different ways that atoms can arrange themselves in a cubic crystal system are shown below.
Nearly all ionic compounds are crystalline solids at room temperature.
Most ionic compounds dissolve in water.
Ionic compounds conduct electricity when molten or dissolved in water. Solid ionic compounds do not conduct electricity because in order for a substance to conduct electricity it must have charged particles that can move freely. Ions in ionic compounds cannot move very much, except to vibrate.
Ionic compounds do not have an overall net charge. They are electrically neutral because the amount of positive charge is equal to the amount of negative charge.
Ionic compounds have higher melting and boiling points compared to other types of compounds (covalent compounds) because the ions in an ionic compound form strong bonds with a number of different ions due to their arrangement into crystalline structures.
Ionic compounds are hard and brittle because their ions are arranged into unit cells which form layers. As long as the layers stay aligned, the ionic compound is hard. But, if one layer is shifted, like charges will be next to one another. The repulsive forces between like ions causes the layers to break apart.
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Re: Types of salts

Post by VK KUMAR on Wed Sep 09, 2015 9:14 pm

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Re: Types of salts

Post by Aneesh Yadav on Wed Sep 09, 2015 4:04 pm

Twisted Evil Idea What a Face
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Re: Types of salts

Post by imanshul on Wed Sep 09, 2015 8:37 am

Gold salts are ionic chemical compounds of gold. The term, which is a misnomer, has evolved into a synonym for the gold compounds used in medicine. The application of gold compounds to medicine is called "chrysotherapy" and "aurotherapy."[1] The first reports of research in this area appeared in 1935,[2] primarily to reduce inflammation and to slow disease progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The use of gold compounds decreased since the 1990s because of numerous side effects and monitoring requirements, limited efficacy, and very slow onset of action. Most chemical compounds of gold, including some of the drugs discussed below, are not, in fact, salts but are examples of metal thiolate complexes.


Medical uses[edit]
Investigation of medical applications of gold salts began at the end of the 19th century, when gold cyanide demonstrated effectiveness against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.[3]

Indications[edit]
The use of injected gold salts is indicated for rheumatoid arthritis. However, the use of gold is now rare due to numerous side effects, the need for continual patient monitoring, limited efficacy and slow onset of action. The efficacy of orally administered gold is even more limited than injectable gold compounds.[4]

Mechanism in arthritis[edit]
The mechanism by which gold drugs affect arthritis is unknown.[4]

Administration[edit]
Gold salts for rheumatoid arthritis are administered by intramuscular injection but can also be administered orally (although the efficacy is low). Regular urine tests to check for protein (indicating kidney damage) and blood tests are needed.

Efficacy[edit]
A 1997 review (Suarez-Almazor ME et al.)[5] reports that treatment with intramuscular gold (parenteral gold) reduces disease activity and joint inflammation. Gold salts taken by mouth are less effective than by injection. Three to six months are often required before gold treatment noticeably improves symptoms.


this ia about types of salts
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Re: Types of salts

Post by Aneesh Yadav on Wed Sep 09, 2015 8:20 am

Hey Guys!! Here is the different type of salts with their uses. Cool Cool Twisted Evil Twisted Evil



What are the different types of salt and what are they used for?
From pickling to adding an 'eggy' flavor, there all kinds of salts capable of enhancing your food — when used in moderation, of course.

Salt, one of the world’s most abundant natural resources, is a natural mineral made up of two elements on the periodic table – sodium and chloride. (Don’t worry, there won’t be an exam at the end of this article.) Salt occurs naturally in the sea, but can also be mined from salt mines on land. There are a variety of different kinds of salt in your local grocery store aisle, so what’s the difference and what is each kind used for? Herein, a primer:

Iodized table salt: This is probably the most common type of salt and the kind you generally use to fill your saltshakers at home. The reason it’s called “iodized” is because today, most salt manufacturers fortify the salt with the mineral iodine, which is an essential mineral for fighting off certain iodine-related diseases like hypothyroidism. But if you need to limit your salt intake, there’s another natural way to get this important mineral into your system — eat more seaweed, which is rich in iodine.

Sea salt: This is salt that is made using evaporated seawater. It generally has larger and coarser crystals than table salt. It is harvested in a number of places in the world, but there are a few standouts. Celtic sea salt is a type of sea salt harvested using a 2,000-year-old method from the water of the Celtic Sea in Brittany, France. Another type of sea salt is fleur de sel (which literally translates to “flower of salt”) which is harvested in the same region of France by manually scraping the top layer off the salt before it sinks to the bottom of a large salt pan. Fleur de sel is considered to be the cream of the crop when it comes to types of sea salts, and one of the most expensive.

Pickling salt: This salt has no additives and is generally used in brines to pickle foods. Because it doesn’t have any additives (regular table salt has anti-caking agents and iodine added), it keeps the liquid from clouding up.

Kosher salt: This salt got its name because it is commonly used when preparing kosher meat. Because it has larger, irregular-shaped, and coarser crystals than regular salt, it does a better job of drawing out the blood of the animal, which is required of kosher meat before cooking. This salt is preferred by many cooks because of its milder flavor and lack of additives.

Himalayan pink salt: This salt is harvested in the foothills of the Himalayan mountain range and is basically fossilized sea salt. It gets its characteristic pink color from the amount of minerals in contains, particularly iron. It is generally more expensive than regular salt, but is also considered healthier and more pure.

Black salt: Also known as Kala Namak, black salt is actually a pinkish-grey color. It is mined in India and has a strong sulphuric smell. It is commonly used to spice food in Southeast Asia and has recently become more popular in the U.S. among vegan chefs who use it for the “eggy” flavor.

Though some salts mentioned above are somewhat healthier versions of classic salt — which is not in and of itself a bad thing — current research shows that too much sodium can lead to a host of health problems, but that’s because most of the sodium that is generally consumed in the American diet comes from processed food. (In other words, it ain’t no fleur de sel.) That being said, cooking at home with the salts mentioned above is your best bet for knowing exactly how much sodium you’re consuming and what’s in it. Of course, that’s just a suggestion; feel free to take it with a grain of salt.


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Types of salts

Post by DAV Science Teacher on Tue Sep 08, 2015 5:26 pm

Dear students , start discussing about the types of salts and their properties.

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